What is a Complete Eye Exam?

A comprehensive eye exam evaluates your visual structure, assesses your eye condition, and for eye ailments, which involves a number of diverse tests. Your vision is considered to be the most important sense to have, and the eyes are extremely complex. Therefore, different tests will examine certain parts of your eyes and vision. Having a complete eye exam is only going to benefit you – it helps by improving your vision, detecting eye complications at an early phase (which is when they are most treatable), and presenting guidelines on how to care for your most essential sense. Here are some tests likely to occur during a complete eye exam:

Eye Muscle Test

This test is perhaps the simplest test for you and your optometrist. The optometrist will watch your eye movements as you follow a moving item, usually a pen or small light. The optometrist will look for muscle weakness, poor control, or poor coordination.

Visual Acuity Test

The visual acuity examination is the test most individuals are familiar with. The examination tests how well you can see a letter or symbol from a certain distance. The chart is usually letters of the alphabet, where the lines go from larger letters to smaller letters. Each eye must be tested separately. Throughout the test, your near vision could be tested- using a card at a distance of a reading level with letters similar to those on the eye chart.

Refraction Assessment

Your optometrist will request that you look through phoropter, which looks like a mask that holds wheels and diverse lenses, to evaluate an arrangement of lenses and give you the strongest visualization possible. The refraction assessment will determine if you require visual aids such as glasses, contact lenses, or in some extreme situations, refractive surgery. During the refraction assessment, light waves are curved as they pass through your cornea and lens.

Visual Field Test

The visual field test governs whether you have trouble seeing in any ranges of your total field of vision. The optometrist will question what you can see without moving your eye. They will be qualified to establish the field of your vision and assist in diagnosing your eye disorder during this test.

Retinal Examination

This exam is also known as ophthalmoscopy or funduscopy, which permits your optometrist to view the back of your eye, retina, the optic disk, and the underlying layer of blood vessels that support the retina. The retinal examination starts with a necessary process of dilating your pupils with eye drops. The purpose of the eye drops is to prevent your pupils from getting smaller when the optometrist shines a light through your eye.

Tonometry Examination

Tonometry tests are to identify glaucoma, which is an ailment that harms the optic nerve. A tonometry exam measures the fluid pressure inside your eye. During applanation tonometry, you will be given eye drops with fluorescein and numbing. Your optometrist will measure the magnitude of force needed to briefly level a part of your cornea. Your optometrist will move the tonometer to touch your cornea and establish the eye density- this process is easy because of the numbness of your eye. Another method to test for glaucoma is noncontact tonometry, where there is a gust of air to assess the pressure in your eye. The noncontact tonometry test entails no utensils or numbness to your eye, but it might be startling to you. If your eye pressure is greater than normal, your optometrist may use a pachometer, which is a device used to produce sound waves to measure the thickness of your cornea.

Get Your Complete Eye Exam at Marano Eye Care

At Marano Eye Care, we are dedicated to offering our patients premium eye care. With offices conveniently located in Livingston, Newark, and Denville NJ, we are here to support our patient’s eye health and improve their vision. To help prevent eye problems and learn more about how to take care of your eyes, do not hesitate to contact us today!